The Food and Drinks Section

Peruvian cuisine is among the most varied and best in the world. It's a reflection of its three main geographical zones, the coast, the Andean highlands and the jungle, and an incorporation of influences from different times and immigrant cultures. Today the Peruvian cuisine combines Pre-Inca and Inca staples and food with the Spanish, Basque, African, Asian and French, Italian and British cuisine which immigrants brought with them; a unique fusion of the culture, traditions and flavors of four continents in which all parts coexist or melt in harmony and even enrich another.

Next to foreign influences and ethnic diversity the Peruvian cuisine is also characterized by Peru's unique climates and landscapes. Each region, each town, has its own local cuisine and culinary treasures, depending on geography and climate that provide different ingredients native to each area.

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Camote

Camote

Peruvian Vegetables
The Camote is distantly related to the potato and its English name is "Sweet Potato". As engravings and paintings on Moche ceramics proof the Camote is part of the Peruvian cuisine for nearly two thousand years. Today we know over 2000 varieties of sweet potatoes.
Papa - Peruvian Potatoes

Papa - Peruvian Potatoes

Peruvian Vegetables
Potatoes were domesticated as early as 10,000 years ago in the High Andes of southeastern Peru and northwestern Bolivia. During centuries the Papa developed to be an important staple food and a primary energy source for early Peruvian cultures.
Palta

Palta

Peruvian Vegetables
The Avocado has a long history of cultivation in Peru. One of the oldest findings regarding Paltas in the country was made in the pre-Incan city of Chan-Chan. In Peru mainly a green type of Avocado is produced which is native to the country.
Choclo

Choclo

Peruvian Vegetables
Peru has around 35 corn varieties. The most popular and most consumed is the Choclo, also known as maiz tierno or jilote. Choclo is a corn variety cultivated in Peru since ancient times. The seeds are bigger than the ones from the sweet corn often consumed in the US or Europe and white to creamy in color.
Maiz Morado

Maiz Morado

Peruvian Vegetables
Maiz Morado is another corn variety cultivated in the Peruvian Andes since ancient times and once has been a staple of the Incan empire.
Yuca

Yuca

Peruvian Vegetables
The yuca, a starchy tuberous root called also manioc, not to be confused with the yucca, is native to South America and was a staple food for many pre-Columbian cultures in Peru. The cassava, as yuca is known in English, was often depicted in indigenous art, like on Moche ceramics.
Mashua (Masho–Añu)

Mashua (Masho–Añu)

Peruvian Vegetables
Mashua, also known as añu, is a root vegetable indigenous to the Andean highlands and cultivated since ancient times. The tubers vary in size and shape. Mashua can be white or yellow; some varieties are even red or purple on the outside.
Olluco (Papa Lisa)

Olluco (Papa Lisa)

Peruvian Vegetables
Ollucos have their origin in the high plains of the Peruvian Andes and are cultivated since pre-Columbian times. Next to potatoes and corn, this root vegetable was an important staple food of the Incas. They come in different shapes and sizes, but usually look like a potato.
Oca

Oca

Peruvian Vegetables
Oca is another native South American tuber grown in the high Andes since pre-Columbian times and was a staple food of various ancient cultures. The finger like tubers can be white, orange, red, pinkish or purple.
Maca

Maca

Peruvian Vegetables
Maca is a root vegetable grown and consumed in the Andean Mountains for centuries. Traditionally, it's always cooked and used in different local dishes. Maca is roasted to produce a delicious snack or dried and mixed with milk to make porridge.
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